April 23, 2014

Thressea Boyd
Director of Communications

VSU Hosts Law Enforcement Training Conference

Dr. Darrell Ross, professor and head of VSU's Sociology, Anthropology and Criminal Justice Department, presented to 45 law enforcement officers during training at VSU April 16-18.

VALDOSTA—Law enforcement officers from across the region participated in a three-day workshop sponsored by Valdosta State University April 16-18.

In its fourth year, the Chiefs of Police Executive Training Series provides advanced level training for law enforcement personnel. The Georgia Association of Chiefs of Police, which certifies and regulates standards for all persons serving in the capacity of chief of police in Georgia, requires at least 20 hours of executive level training per year.

With limited availability for advanced law enforcement training, Lt. Tim Yorkey, VSU training specialist for Employee and Organizational Development, and Dr. Darrell Ross, professor and head of VSU’s Sociology, Anthropology and Criminal Justice Department, developed the Executive Training Series. In addition, Ross presented at the 2012 Georgia Association of Chiefs of Police summer conference and has been invited to present again at the 2014 conference.

Hahira Police Chief Terry Davis has been attending VSU’s law enforcement training the past four years and appreciates the high quality training that is offered through the university.

“The caliber of training is phenomenal,” said Davis, who has worked with the Hahira Police Department for 33 years. “I attend law enforcement training in Georgia and through the international association and the training provided at VSU is second to none.”

Ross and Yorkey have been collaborating on the training conference since 2011. It is a joint effort between VSU’s office of Employee and Organizational Development and the Center for Applied Social Sciences, which was established to foster and support the expansion of human knowledge through innovation, research, and creative activities.

“The conference fits within VSU’s and the Center’s mission by providing life-long and service learning for regional and state stakeholders (law enforcement professionals and law enforcement agencies),” said Ross. “The resources of VSU are being used in an outreach strategy to benefit regional and statewide law enforcement agencies through ongoing education and training, which will enhance their ability to lead their agencies effectively and efficiently.”

The law enforcement participants were given training on retention strategies for managers; police and citizen contact through roadblocks and vehicle checkpoints; dealing with prone restraint, excited delirium, and the sudden death of inmates while in custody; and use of force policy management training.

“This regional training began four years ago as a resource to ensure our area law enforcement executives and command level officers have an opportunity to receive quality training,” said Yorkey. “This training is free and provides a central location where agencies can send officers. It reduces or eliminates costly travel expenses and in many cases allows for officers to be close to his or her jurisdiction and home.”

The training is also available for non-command staff personnel and qualifies for training credits in the Georgia Peace Officer Standards and Training System.